Can a Felon Vote in Nevada? - JobsForFelonsHub.com

Can a Felon Vote in Nevada?

Nevada counted itself as the 36th state to enter the US on October 31, 1864. The state capital is located at Carson City and the largest city in the state is Las Vegas. Nevada, which is the 7th biggest state in the US, is made up of almost 110,568 square miles overall. People who live in Nevada are known as Nevadans. The major industries represented by the state include tourism, hydro-electric power and the mining of gold and silver. T

he highest point in the state is located at Boundary Peak, which is approximately 13,140 feet or 4,005 meters above sea level. Bordering states include California, Arizona, Oregon, Idaho and Utah.

The origin of the word, “Nevada,” comes from a Spanish word, which means “Snowcapped.” The state nicknames are the Sagebrush State” and the “Silver State” and the state motto is “All for Our Country.” The state song, “Home Means Nevada,” has a special meaning for felons who regain their voting rights.

According to the Brennan Centre for Justice at the New York University School of Law, voting rights are automatically reinstituted to felons that complete their sentences for first-time convictions. However, felons with certain convictions, including felonies that are classified as “Category A” felonies, or those individuals with multiple convictions, arising from other instances, are permanently unable to vote unless they receive restoration of their civil rights through the court system or are pardoned by the government.

Felon Voting Law in Nevada

According to the Secretary of State’s Office for the state of Nevada, the state legislature passed Assembly Bill 55 in 2003, which reinstated the right to vote for certain felons. Pursuant to NRS 213-155, anyone who is convicted of certain felonies and has been discharged honorably is immediately able to register to vote.

Felons who have had their civil rights restored, including the right to vote, are required to present an official document of honorable discharge or a court order that restores the felon’s electoral privilege. An official document of prison release or a court order that restores the right to vote then are needed at the time of voter registration. The registrant felon should present evidence, if required, that a conviction was overturned or his civil rights were restored. The county clerk for voter registration should be contacted for further details.

How a Felon in Nevada Can Restore Their Voting Rights

In addition to providing the above-mentioned paperwork, felons in Nevada, when filling out the registration application, should answer three eligibility questions. They should be a citizen of the US and 18 years old on or before the next election. They should also be residents of Nevada at least 30 days in their county and 10 days in their voter precinct before the next election date.

If registering online, a voter applicant should fill out his personal contact details, print out the form and sign it. The form can be mailed or delivered to the registrar of voters or county clerk’s office for your county. You may also register at any Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles office or at a registrar of voters or county clerk’s office. Social service agencies and college campuses also provide registration applications. You can obtain further details by clicking on the following link.

Other Resources For Felons in Nevada

Getting Started: If this is your first time to our website, we highly recommend that you visit our getting started page to understand everything we have to offer. You can do so by clicking here.

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Legal Representation: If you're in need of an expungement attorney to try to get rid of your felony in Alabama, or need a criminal lawyer or other type of lawyer, you can get a FREE consultation by clicking here to visit our legal representation page.

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