Can a Felon Vote in Oregon? - JobsForFelonsHub.com

Can a Felon Vote in Oregon?

Oregon officially became the 33rd US state on Valentine’s Day in 1859. The state capital of Oregon is Salem and the largest city is Portland. The state is made up of 98,386 square miles, which makes it the 9th largest state in the country. People who live in Oregon are known as Oregonians. Major industries in the state include the production of paper products, timber harvesting, coal mining, the manufacture of computer equipment and electronics and wheat and cattle farming.

The highest point in the state is Mt. Hood, which rises 11,239 feet or 3,426 meters above sea level. The state, which contains 36 counties, borders California, Idaho, Washington, Nevada and the Pacific Ocean. The origin of the state’s name is unknown. However, some believe that it originated from the French word, Ouragan, which means “Hurricane.” The state nickname is the “Beaver State” and the state mottoes are “She Flies with Her Own Wings” and “The Union.” The state song is “Oregon, My Oregon,” a ballad that is sung by Oregonians who serve their prison sentence and regain the right to vote.

Felons in Oregon instantly regain their civil right to vote upon release from prison. Any felon who is not incarcerated can vote in Oregon. Therefore, if you are on probation or parole, you have the right to vote.

Felon Voting Law in Oregon

The registration deadline for voting after release from prison is at least 21 days before the scheduled election date. Oregon features closed primaries. Therefore, you must register with a specific party to vote in primary elections. Any felon who is not serving time in prison can vote in Oregon. If he or she is on parole or probation, then they have the right to cast a ballot at the polls. Supporting information can be sourced by clicking on this link.

How a Felon in Oregon Can Restore Their Voting Rights

Oregon permits felons to re-register to vote, provided they are –

· 18 years old by the scheduled election date

· A US citizen and resident of Oregon

· Deemed mentally competent to vote by law

· Not incarcerated

In order to vote, you must present a valid driver’s license from the state of Oregon or a state ID that is issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). While a suspended driver’s license is considered a valid ID, a license that has been revoked is not.

If you cannot provide a valid state ID or driver’s license, you will need to present the last four digits for your Social Security number. If you do not have a driver’s license, state ID or a Social Security number, any of the other identifications are acceptable:

· Valid photo ID

· Stub from a paycheck

· Bank statement

· Utility bill

· Government document

· Proof of eligibility under the VAEH (Voting Accessibility for the Elderly or Handicapped) Act or the UOCAVA (Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting) Act

You can re-register to vote by downloading an Oregon voter registration card or fill out the card online. You can also re-register at any county elections office, DMV office or the Secretary of State’s office. Forms can also be mailed to the county elections office or faxed to the same agency. Voter registration can be checked online or determined by contacting the local county elections office. Read more about the criteria by clicking on this link.

Other Resources For Felons in Oregon

Getting Started: If this is your first time to our website, we highly recommend that you visit our getting started page to understand everything we have to offer. You can do so by clicking here.

Jobs For Felons: If you're a felon looking for a job in Alabama, we have all of the resources you need including job listings by city, companies that hire felons, and our own job board. Click Here to learn more.

Legal Representation: If you're in need of an expungement attorney to try to get rid of your felony in Alabama, or need a criminal lawyer or other type of lawyer, you can get a FREE consultation by clicking here to visit our legal representation page.

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