Can a Felon Vote in Kansas? - JobsForFelonsHub.com

Can a Felon Vote in Kansas?

Admitted as the 34th state in the US, Kansas gained statehood on January 29, 1861. The state capital of the state is Topeka and the largest city is Wichita. With an overall area of just over 82,000 square miles, Kansas is the 15th largest state in the US. People who reside in the state are known as Kansans. The state’s major industries include aircraft manufacturing, auto manufacturing and the growing and harvesting of wheat and other grains.

The state nickname for Kansas is the “Sunflower State” and the state song is “Home on the Range.” The state motto reads Ad astra per aspera, which is translated as – To the stars through difficulties. This type of wish is often realized when felons automatically regain their right to vote after completing their prison term.

In Kansas, felons automatically obtain their right to vote, once they complete their prison sentence and complete probation or parole. Voting rights are also instantly restored after the completion of all supervised release. Felons need to re-register to vote in order to once again enjoy their electoral privilege. You can resource these details by clicking on this link.

Felon Voting Law in Kansas

Any resident of Kansas is disqualified from entering a voting booth if they are serving time for a federal or state felony conviction. After the terms of the sentence, probation or parole are completed, a felon can once again vote, hold public office or serve on a jury.

When an individual is convicted of a felony, the National Voter Registration Act mandates that notification be made by the US Attorney in each judicial district in order to inform the Secretary of State’s office of current felony convictions. The Secretary of State’s office, in turn, forward this notice to the proper county election officer so the voting rights of the felon can be revoked. The county election officer is required to cancel the voter registrations of all individuals that have been convicted of state felonies as well. You can obtain further details by following this link.

How a Felon in Kansas Can Restore Their Voting Rights

A felon who has lost his voting right may, again, register to vote after he has completed his sentence. When registering to vote, a felon does not need to show a proof of final discharge. The voter registration form in Kansas is designed so it contains an affidavit, above the signature line, that attests that voting rights were restored. Anyone who signs a false affidavit is guilty of a felony.

In order to vote in Kansas you must meet the following criteria in order to fill out a voter registration with the local county election office:

· You must be a resident of the state. (While there is no length of residency requirement needed to vote in Kansas, you must be registered 21 days before the scheduled election date and must be a resident at the time of registration.)

· You must be 18 years old

· You must be a citizen of the US (Anyone registering for the first time needs to submit a proof of US citizenship.)

(If you move within the state from one county to the next, your name is removed from the former county’s listing and included on the voter registration of the new residence. This is facilitated by re-registration or by filling out a driver’s license change of address.)

As you can see, stability is essential when you regain your voting rights. Showing you are committed to being a solid citizen will make it possible for you to erase any negative experiences in the past and move forward with expectation.

Other Resources For Felons in Kansas

Getting Started: If this is your first time to our website, we highly recommend that you visit our getting started page to understand everything we have to offer. You can do so by clicking here.

Jobs For Felons: If you're a felon looking for a job in Alabama, we have all of the resources you need including job listings by city, companies that hire felons, and our own job board. Click Here to learn more.

Legal Representation: If you're in need of an expungement attorney to try to get rid of your felony in Alabama, or need a criminal lawyer or other type of lawyer, you can get a FREE consultation by clicking here to visit our legal representation page.

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