Can a Felon Vote in Georgia? - JobsForFelonsHub.com

Can a Felon Vote in Georgia?

Georgia, which was the 4th state to enter the US, made the admittance official on January 2, 1788. The state’s capital and largest city is Atlanta and the land area of the state, which contains almost 60,000 square miles, makes Georgia the 24th largest state. Residents of the state are known as Georgians. Georgians work in the state’s major industries of agriculture (cotton, peanuts, poultry, soybeans and corn), as well as in textiles and timber (especially pine).

Georgia is the birthplace of former US President James (“Jimmy:) Earl Carter, Jr., who was born on October 1, 1924 in the town of Plains. The origin of the state’s name references King George II of England. The state’s nicknames are the Peach State and the Empire State of the South. “Georgia on my Mind” is the state song while “Wisdom, Justice and Moderation” is the motto for the state. Indeed, that motto applies to felons who are hoping to regain their civil right to vote. Happily, electoral privileges can be restored after the completion of a sentence or after the felon completes his term for parole or probation.

Felons are ineligible to cast a ballot while they incarcerated, on parole or serving probation. However, after the felon has completed his sentence and upon the finalization of supervised release, he can vote. He must also make sure that any fines and fees related to his case are paid. The right to vote is automatically restored once the aforementioned requirements are met. You can reference the prerequisites by clicking on the following link.

Felon Voting Law in Georgia

In the state of Georgia, the Georgia Justice Project (GJP) has devoted its activities to eliminating some of the barriers that are put up against people who have a criminal record. According the state constitution, the right to vote is denied to anyone convicted of a felony crime involving moral turpitude. The restoration of said rights is not made until the felon completes his sentence and pays any related fines or fees. He must also complete parole, probation or supervised releases.

This reference is made in Article II, Section 1, Paragraph 3 of the state’s constitution. According to the GJP, the state has the 10th highest rate in the country of people who cannot vote because of their criminal record.

You have a right to vote in Georgia after your sentence and related processes have been completed. To ensure your right in this respect, read the content provided by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) on their site.

How a Felon in Georgia Can Restore Their Voting Rights

Again, Georgia makes it possible for felons to re-register to vote once they have completed the terms of their sentences and parole or probation. As long as they have paid the associated legal fees and fines as well, they can once again make an application to vote.

However, it has been found that employees in some local county voter registration facilities are misinformed about Georgia law. Others cannot determine electoral eligibility when a felon tries to make application. As a result, many felons, who are discouraged from voting, are unable to vote because of this lack of knowledge and prejudice.

Anyone who has difficulties along these lines is advised to contact an attorney or the Georgia Justice Project so they can reassert their civil right. To make registration easier, you may also refer to the online registration provided through the Georgia Secretary of State’s office.

Other Resources For Felons in Georgia

Getting Started: If this is your first time to our website, we highly recommend that you visit our getting started page to understand everything we have to offer. You can do so by clicking here.

Jobs For Felons: If you're a felon looking for a job in Alabama, we have all of the resources you need including job listings by city, companies that hire felons, and our own job board. Click Here to learn more.

Legal Representation: If you're in need of an expungement attorney to try to get rid of your felony in Alabama, or need a criminal lawyer or other type of lawyer, you can get a FREE consultation by clicking here to visit our legal representation page.

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